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#1
Mục Lục Kỹ Thuật

Microcontroller vs Microprocessor: What’s the difference? #11, p 1
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#2
Mục Lục Y Học

Alzheimer's Disease
YT Causes Alzheimer's & Dementia & How To PREVENT IT! #12, p 1

Sức Khoẻ:
Mùi người già, #20, p 2

Old person smell, #21, p 2

Thuốc men:
WebMD Health Benefits of Moringa #13, p 1
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#3
Mục Lục Thể Dục 


YouTube:
100+ runners (male and female), #14, p 1
At 97, she flexes her muscle at Tampa Bay competition, # 15, p 1
96-Year-Old That Stays Fit with Yoga and Dance, #16, p 2

Articles:
Tips for Healthy Joints: Exercise, Nutrition, & More in Pictures, #17, p 2
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#4
Mục Lục Gia Đình

YT Keep your elderly parents safe and in their home longer, #18, p 2

Help seniors learn new technology, #19, p 2
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#5
Mục Lục E
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#6
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#7
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#8
Mục Lục I
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#9
Mục Lục K
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#10
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#11
Microcontroller vs Microprocessor: What’s the difference?
Linsey Knerl
|

November 11, 2019

Do you know what a microcontroller does? Are you familiar with how it differs from a microprocessor? If you don't know the answers to these questions, you are not alone. Many people aren't sure of the difference between these standard PC components. In this article, we’ll explore what makes each component special and why their differences matter.

What is a microprocessor?

Also known as a central processing unit, or CPU, the microprocessor (MPU) is the brain of the computer. It doesn’t contain any other components, such as memory. Microprocessors are vital to computers of all types, and the technology is commonly found in the desktops and laptops we use today.


While you won’t usually be asked to choose a type of microprocessor, there are five types. They include:


  1. Complex instruction set microprocessors
  2. Reduced instruction set microprocessors
  3. Superscalar processors
  4. Application specific integrated circuit
  5. Digital signal multiprocessors

Each of these performs a variety of tasks, including math and logic processes that tell the computer how to behave, store data, and interact with other devices. It takes the data coming in, processes it, and sends it back to the components or peripherals that you use to interact with the computer. A microprocessor is formed as a microchip, making it a very small solution to our very big computing tasks.

Microprocessors in HP computers

If you own one of the many popular HP laptops and desktops, you are likely already enjoying the features of today’s microprocessors. Intel® i3, i5, and i7 MPUs offer a variety of perks for users who want lightning-fast speeds for gaming, creating art, rendering video, and browsing the web.


It’s hard to believe that the newest generation of Intel microprocessors, the 8th Generation, can do so much since the first commercially available unit was invented in by Intel in the early 1970s. Powering everything from calculators to super-advanced PCs, our lives wouldn’t be the same without these technological gems.


When it comes time to shop for your next computer, the microprocessor may be the most important choice you’ll make. For the Intel line, remember that the larger number indicates more processing power. For typical office use, an i3 may work just fine. But for high-speed gaming, it’s recommended that you invest in the i7 MPU.

What is a microcontroller?

Microcontrollers (MCUs) control a specific function instead of handling the data for hundreds or thousands of functions. One other big difference is that they aren’t just a CPU on a chip. They are an entire computer on a chip, including the microprocessor, memory, and components needed to send and receive data.


Microcontrollers are made to do a specific job on their own. They are a complete system. The types of microcontrollers include:

  • 8-bit microcontroller
  • 16-bit microcontroller
  • 32-bit microcontroller
  • Embedded microcontroller

As you can see from the types listed, they are grouped by data size. Could there be larger microcontrollers in our future? Quite possibly.


MCUs are used in everything from toys and tools, to remote controls and appliances. You can't see them working, and there's no user interface to tell them what to do. You'll also find them in vehicle anti-lock braking systems and in advanced medical devices. They are programmed to do their job independently even when no one is around to provide inputs.

Microcontroller vs microprocessor

There’s no way to really say that one type of technology is better than the other. They both have separate functions and work for completely different applications.


An easy way to remember what each does, however, is to think of microprocessors as the brain for the computers we use as consumers. It runs the operating system, such as Windows 10, that allows us to interact with programs, adjust settings, and perform tasks like sending emails or creating documents.


A microcontroller, on the other hand, is a tiny computer on a chip that runs without a sophisticated operating system and can run one thread or loop at a time. It can’t handle the multiple tasks that a microprocessor does. Most consumers won’t be asked to pick out or shop for a microcontroller. These are generally used in programming and engineering fields at a very detailed level of technology.


Fun fact: While microprocessors were originally nicknamed a “computer on a chip,” it’s the microcontroller that better fits this description because it has a processor, memory, and other components built into one tiny microchip.

Additional differences between microprocessors and microcontrollers

Since the microprocessor is a more robust component, it uses more energy, needs external cooling, and can be used with larger machines. It is also more expensive and can be very fast.


A microcontroller uses very little energy because it does one or two basic tasks. There is no need for a dedicated fan for this device, and it’s only as expensive as the components featured on the chip. It’s very affordable but operates much slower than a microprocessor.

The future of “micro” tech

As tech advances, we see the microcontroller start to pick up additional functionality. More tasks can be done, and the data it can process within an embedded system will expand. Microprocessors are starting to incorporate more possibilities as well.


Could the two somewhat overlap in definition? It’s possible, but there is no way they can be used interchangeably. Each has a very specific role in computers and electronic gear. One can’t replace the other any time soon, but they’re both vital when it comes to using the products we enjoy every day.


ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Linsey Knerl is a contributing writer for HP® Tech Takes. Linsey is a Midwest-based author, public speaker, and member of the ASJA. She has a passion for helping consumers and small business owners do more with their resources via the latest tech solutions.
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#12
Doctor REVEALS What Causes Alzheimer's & Dementia & How To PREVENT IT! | Dr. David Perlmutter


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#13
WebMD - Health Benefits of Moringa
By Keri Wiginton


https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-suppl...%20muscle.


IN THIS ARTICLE

  1. Are There Health Benefits?
  2. Uses of Moringa
  3. Is It Safe?
Moringa oleifera is a plant native to northern India that can also grow in other tropical and sub-tropical places, like Asia and Africa. Folk medicine has used the leaves, flowers, seeds, and roots of this plant for centuries.

It's traditionally been used as a remedy for such conditions as:

  • Diabetes
  • Long-lasting inflammation
  • Bacterial, viral, and fungal infections
  • Joint pain
  • Heart health
  • Cancer

Are There Health Benefits?


Moringa has many important vitamins and minerals. The leaves have 7 times more vitamin C than oranges and 15 times more potassium than bananas. It also has calcium, protein, iron, and amino acids, which help your body heal and build muscle.

It's also packed with antioxidants, substances that can protect cells from damage and may boost your immune system. There's some evidence that some of these antioxidants can also lower blood pressure and reduce fat in the blood and body.

Uses of Moringa


So far, much of the research on moringa has used animals as test subjects. We don't know if the results would be the same with humans. Researchers are working to find out exactly how extracts from this tree affect people, but early studies show it may help with:

Rheumatoid arthritis:
Moringa leaf extract may lower fluid swelling, redness, and pain.

Diabetes: Several early studies show that insulin-like proteins found in moringa may help lower blood sugar. Plant chemicals found in the leaves might help the body process sugar better, and it may affect how the body releases insulin.

Cancer: In lab tests, leaf extracts slowed the growth of pancreatic cancer cells and helped chemotherapy work better. Other lab studies show that moringa leaves, bark, and roots all have anti-cancer effects that might lead to new drugs.

Memory: Some experts think the antioxidants and other health-promoting plant chemicals may heal stress and inflammation in the brain.

Scientists are also trying to see if it might help with:

  • Cholesterol
  • Arthritis
  • High blood pressure
  • Liver damage caused by medicines
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Asthma
  • Wound healing
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Diarrhea
  • Anemia
  • Weight Loss

Is It Safe?


Research shows that it's generally OK to eat the leaves or young seed pods, and leaf extracts made from powder and water may also be safe. But it can be dangerous to eat bark or pulp, especially for pregnant women. Chemicals in the bark may make the uterus contract and lead to a miscarriage.

Though you can buy it as a powder, pill, oil, or tea, supplements and powders made from moringa aren't regulated by the FDA. That means there isn’t a standard dose you should take for health benefits. And companies don’t have to prove that their product is safe or that it works as advertised.

Don't use it if you're pregnant or breastfeeding. Talk to your doctor before taking moringa or any supplement, especially if you take any medications.
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#14
100-Year-Old WWII Veteran Lester Wright 26.34 100m At Penn Relays




103-year-old runner breaks a new record


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#15
At 97, she flexes her muscle at Tampa Bay competition

Everyday Tampa Bay video series: video by Monica Herndon, Times Staff Photojournalist
Edith Traina stood in line at a church banquet hall, dressed in a black singlet with white piping. When her turn came, she stepped onto a bathroom scale. That would determine her weight class, though it didn’t really matter, as she was the only participant in her age group: 95-99 years old.

Traina, who is 97, may seem an unlikely weightlifter, but she was one of seven elderly women who traveled from Tampa Bay to compete in the Polk County Senior Games in Lakeland recently. They wore matching T-shirts that read, "Bill Beekley Academy of Powerlifting Senior Division."

The group attends about six competitions each year, including the Hillsborough County Senior Games in the fall.

Traina likes the challenge of competing, to demonstrate what she’s capable of, and because "you’re also proving to yourself that you’re able to do something you probably never thought you could do."

At the senior games, she took gold with a 60-pound bench press and a 130-pound deadlift.



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